Climate change, greta thunberg, James May, Jeremy Clarkson, the grand tour, Top Gear, trump

Jeremy Clarkson feels ‘threated’ by Greta Thunberg, his co-host says


The Grand Tour” host Jeremy Clarkson has made no secret of his dislike for Greta Thunberg, the outspoken climate change activist from Sweden who was just named Time magazine’s Person of the Year. Clarkson has labeled the 16-year-old an “idiot” and blamed her for “killing” interest in car shows. One of his co-hosts, Richard Hammond, agrees with him, saying young people aren’t interested in cars.

But the show’s other co-host, James May, does not. Asked about his cohort’s comments, May told an entertainment news site, “He’s feeling threatened or something,” going on to point to shows like “The Grand Tour,” their former gig “Top Gear,” now starring a different cast, and “quite a few on the Internet” as proof that interest in car shows hasn’t waned.

May later went on to say that cars in European cities are expensive, adding, “They’re difficult to manage, it’s difficult to find somewhere to put them, and the insurance is horrifying. At the moment we have Uber, and public transport is actually pretty good in places like London. It’s not that young people aren’t interested in cars, it’s just that they don’t need to be interested.”

It’s a new twist for the television trio, who are gearing up for a fourth season of the Amazon Prime series. Clarkson lost his job hosting “Top Gear” after he punched one of the show’s producers because there was no hot food after a long day of filming.

Clarkson once wrote of Thunberg in a Sun column, “We gave you mobile phones and laptops and the internet. We created the social media you use every day and we run the banks that pay for it all. So how dare you stand there and lecture us, you spoilt brat.”

He’s not the only public figure of his age group to lash out at the 16-year-old activist famous for leading a youth movement urging action to prevent a climate catastrophe. President Trump on Thursday reacted to Thunberg’s Time magazine honor by tweeting that “Greta must work on her Anger Management problem” and urging her to “Chill.”

NPR reports that Thunberg has since changed her Twitter bio to read, “A teenager working on her anger management problem. Currently chilling and watching a good old fashioned movie with a friend.”

We’ll see if Clarkson can match her poised response when he responds to his co-host’s jibe.

Speaking of “The Grand Tour,” here’s the trailer for its upcoming Season Four, “Seamen,” which is set on boats in Southeast Asia.

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Climate change

Climate change policies are going to be costly, says U.N.-backed report

LONDON — Tighter government climate regulations by 2025 could wipe up to $2.3 trillion off the value of companies in industries ranging from fossil fuel producers to agriculture and car makers, an investor group warned in a report.

Rules aimed at lowering carbon emissions are expected to accelerate in the coming years as countries scramble to meet obligations under the 2015 Paris climate agreement limiting global warming.

Any abrupt policy shifts risk severely disrupting current investment strategies, U.N.-backed Principles of Responsible Investing (PRI), a group representing investors with $86 trillion of assets under management, said in a report.

“As the realities of climate change catch up, social pressure mounts, and low carbon solutions get cheaper, it’s highly improbable that governments will be allowed to let the world sleep-walk into greater rises in temperature without being compelled into forceful action sooner,” PRI Chief Executive Fiona Reynolds said.

“This poses huge threats for assets and for the wider system.”

Most exposed is the fossil fuel sector which could lose one third of its current value, the report said. Fossil fuels account for around two thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions.

Coal firms could lose as much as 44% in value, while the world’s top oil and gas companies risk losing up to 31% of their current market share, according the report which forecasts oil demand peaking around 2027.

The analysis showed that broad index-based funds such as the iShares MSCI ACWI ETF could lose up to 4.5% or $2.3 trillion in its value under the most extreme scenario.

The shift would nevertheless also lead to winners.

Auto makers heavily invested in electric vehicles and electric utility firms using low-carbon power could more than double their values, the report said.

The report came out as world leaders meet in Madrid for the 2019 United Nations climate change conference, known as COP25.

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