Car News, chevrolet blazer, electric cars, electric trucks, Ford Ranger, General Chat, Mazda, mazda cx-5, mazda3, Mustang mach e, New Cars, Nissan, Porsche, subaru outback, Tech + Cars, Tesla, toyota supra, United States

CarGurus: Our Automotive Highlights of 2019 – The CarGurus Blog


Few could argue that 2019 has been a fascinating year in the world of motoring – but what are your automotive highlights of 2019? We’d love for you to tell us in the comments section below this article, or via the CarGurus Facebook page. To get you started, below our writers have put forward their own automotive highlights of 2019, from pickups to Porsches.

Chris Knapman, Editor, CarGurus UK

Will time show that 2019 was the year the electric car broke through? There’s certainly been no shortage of new products using battery power, from the Porsche Taycan and latest Nissan Leaf to the impossible-to-ignore Tesla Cybertruck.

Combine these new cars with an improving charging infrastructure and you’d expect the tide of public opinion might start showing signs of softening towards EVs. That was certainly the case according to our own research, which revealed that the number of consumers who consider themselves as likely to own an EV in the next five years jumped to 26% in 2019, up from 15% in 2018. This is most likely just the start, too: Who would bet against that number having grown significantly by this time next year?

Back in the world of internal combustion, my honorable mention for 2019 must go to the latest generation of Porsche 911, the 992. Not only does it masterfully update the legendary 911 format for this hi-tech age with its fabulous interior and ultra-sleek exterior, but in terms of performance, the 992 moves even the basic, non-GT or Turbo models firmly into supercar territory. In fact, if I had to narrow down my automotive highlights of 2019 into just one, fleeting moment, it’d be the surreal three-point-something seconds it took our four-wheel drive, PDK-equipped 911 test car to fire from 0-62 mph.

Electric vehicles might be coming, but internal combustion is still more than capable of taking your breath away.

Megan Hennessey, Editor, CarGurus US

I’m struck by the number of performance wagons and SUVs we saw introduced in 2019. Fans of the Audi S4 Avant rejoiced when the German automaker revealed it was bringing its RS 6 Avant to North America. It packs a 4.0-liter V8 that makes 591 hp and 590 lb-ft, hits 60 mph in about 3 seconds, and reaches a top speed of 189 mph.

Just as exciting was the introduction of the RS Q8, a performance SUV packing the same power as the RS 6 Avant. We had a chance to take a closer look at the 2020 RS Q8 at the 2019 LA Auto Show, and it adds plenty of features aside from the engine, like 23-inch wheels and an RS-specific gloss-black grille.

And in the EV space, electric trucks took center stage: Bollinger brought us a production-ready version of its B2 electric truck, Tesla unveiled its unique Cybertruck, and Rivian gets closer to its production-ready model of the R1T. But are truck shoppers willing to make the switch from gas-powered to electric? It’s hard to say. In our yearly Truck Sentiment Survey, we found that 70% of shoppers were willing to switch brands, which is good news for these startup truckmakers. However, their high prices may keep shoppers away.

Steve Halloran, Editor, CarGurus US

With one colleague celebrating electric vehicles and another performance wagons and SUVs, I feel obliged to mention one 2019 highlight they didn’t: Ford’s live-streamed debut of the 2021 Mustang Mach-E just before the LA Auto Show. Ford’s decision to put the name and badge of its mighty Mustang on an electric crossover generated controversy, of course, but a pony-equipped vehicle with up to 300 miles of range, usable seating for 5, almost 60 cubic feet of cargo room, and a 0-to-60 time of less than 4 seconds sounds great to me.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E

But my 2019 highlights came from two automakers CarGurus has found compelling for years, Mazda and Subaru, in the form of strong new versions of proven models. The redesigned 2019 Mazda3 earned rave reviews from almost everyone who drove it, including George Kennedy, and the updated 2019 CX-5, which we sampled in the snow at the end of last year, also earned praise from a wide variety of reviewers.

2020 Mazda3

A new version of our favorite Subaru model also arrived in 2019. We got a chance to drive the 2020 Subaru Outback back in September and enjoyed it quite a bit. The new edition of this wagon/crossover finally offers a turbocharged engine under its hood, which drivers living at high altitudes should particularly appreciate. Our recently published review of the 2020 Outback found it strong from functionality and cost-effectiveness standpoints, which we consider hallmarks of the Subaru brand.

2020 Subaru Outback

Matt Smith, Editor, CarGurus US

This time of year, everyone’s talking about electrification and progress and the hot new thing. But as anyone with their eyes open can clearly see, 2019 was the year of the throwback.

First, Chevy resurrected the Blazer as a stylish, sharp, and sexy crossover complete with nearly $1,400 worth of 21-inch tires. Sure, the new 2019 Blazer had its detractors, namely those bemoaning its lack of off-road performance, but I, for one, welcome our new crossover overlords.

And it’s not as if 2019 didn’t bring us plenty of rugged capability, either. Carrying on with the throwback theme, both Ford and Jeep returned legendary truck nameplates to the market, with the 2019 Ranger and 2020 Gladiator.

Finally, the highlight of the year for this writer was the long-awaited return of the Toyota Supra. Partnering with BMW gave the new coupe a brilliant Bavarian heart and soul (or engine and chassis, for our more literal readers) to pair with its stunning exterior styling. Sure, the 2020 GR Supra’s interior might feel a bit familiar, and the lack of a manual transmission will cut it off some enthusiasts’ shopping lists, but it’s safe to say that no other car on CarGurus’ 2019 test-drive review roster received as much attention at gas stations, grocery stores, race tracks, or anywhere else we drove it.

For more car news, check out these articles:

<!-- -->



Source link

Audi, Audi A4, BMW, BMW 330, BMW 330 2019, BMW 330 2020, Chevrolet, Chevrolet Malibu, Ford, Ford Fusion, Honda, Honda Accord, hyundai, Hyundai Sonata, Kia, Kia Optima, Lexus, Lexus ES 350, Mazda, Mazda Mazda6, Mercedes-Benz, Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Nissan, Nissan Altima, Nissan Maxima, Subaru, subaru outback, Tesla, Tesla Model 3, Toyota, Toyota Camry

IIHS Testing Finds Pedestrian Detection Systems Vary Widely in Crash Protection | News from Cars.com



<meta itemprop=”width” content=”1170″>
<meta itemprop=”height” content=”1170″>
IIHS pedestrian crash system testing

IIHS images

Pedestrian crash-prevention systems with automatic braking on 16 mid-size cars vary widely in their ability to detect and avoid hitting people in the street, according to the latest round of testing by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Related: Which SUVs Have the Best Pedestrian Detection Systems?

But results overall were fairly positive. Four luxury and two mainstream mid-size cars and wagons got the top rating, called superior (out of superior, advanced, basic or none), for pedestrian crash prevention. Another six cars rated a notch lower, at advanced. Four non-luxury cars, however, earned only a basic rating or got no credit at all. Here are the 16 (some have two scores because they offer both standard and optional systems):

Vehicles Rated Superior

  • 2019 Audi A4 (standard system)
  • 2019-20 BMW 3 Series (standard)
  • 2020 Subaru Outback (standard)
  • 2019-20 Mercedes-Benz C-Class (optional upgraded system)
  • 2019-20 Nissan Maxima (optional for 2019, standard for 2020)
  • 2019 Volvo S60 (standard)

Vehicles Rated Advanced

  • 2019-20 BMW 3 Series (optional upgraded system — yes, worse than the base system)
  • 2019-20 Honda Accord (standard)
  • 2019-20 Lexus ES 350 (standard)
  • 2019 Mazda 6 (standard)
  • 2019-20 Nissan Altima (optional)
  • 2019-20 Tesla Model 3 (standard)
  • 2019-20 Toyota Camry (standard)

Vehicles Rated Basic

  • 2019-20 Chevrolet Malibu (optional camera-only system)
  • 2019-20 Chevrolet Malibu (optional camera and radar system)
  • 2019-20 Mercedes-Benz C-Class (standard system)

No Credit

  • 2019-20 Ford Fusion (standard system)
  • 2019 Hyundai Sonata (optional)
  • 2019 Kia Optima (optional)

More Cars Have Pedestrian Systems Standard

IIHS is ramping up testing of pedestrian protection, having earlier tested a batch of SUVs. The vast majority of automakers have agreed to make automatic emergency braking standard by 2022, and they’re increasingly upgrading such systems to detect and automatically brake for pedestrians, not just other vehicles. According to IIHS, about two-thirds of front crash systems offered on 2019 model-year vehicles have pedestrian detection. In many cases, these systems now are standard.

“Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, so it’s encouraging that pedestrian crash prevention systems are standard equipment in 12 out of the 16 mid-size cars we tested, including five out of six superior-rated systems,” said IIHS President David Harkey in a statement. The agency will factor pedestrian detection into its overall testing for Top Safety Pick and Top Safety Pick Plus awards beginning with the 2020 model year, spokesman Russ Rader has told Cars.com. It began testing pedestrian detection in February.

Halloween Is Scariest Day for Pedestrians

IIHS notes that its latest results come just ahead of Halloween, which is consistently the deadliest day for U.S. pedestrians. That’s thanks in part to trick-or-treaters and, we suspect, increasingly partying adults in awkward costumes. IIHS claims that from 2013 to 2017, the two deadliest days for pedestrians on average were Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 (after midnight on Halloween). Citing its own study of federal crash data, IIHS notes that annual pedestrian fatalities had increased markedly since a 2009 low. More than 6,000 pedestrians were killed in 2018, up 53 percent since 2009, according to the agency.

How Cars Were Tested

Most frontal crash systems use one or two cameras, in some cases augmented by radar sensors, to look for objects ahead. Vehicle software now can detect pedestrians as well as vehicles, and in some cases identify bicycles or animals. If a collision is imminent, the system alerts the driver and can hit the brakes to prevent or mitigate a crash.

IIHS tests three scenarios with dummies: an adult stepping into the street ahead of a vehicle with an unobstructed view, a child darting into the street from behind two parked cars, and an adult pedestrian near the side of the road facing away from traffic. The first two tests are done at 12 and 25 mph; the pedestrian near the side of the road is tested at 25 and 37 mph. In each test, the system has 1 or 2 seconds to stop the car to avoid the pedestrian. The tests are done in daylight on dry pavement. IIHS notes that such systems might not perform as well at night, but it says a vehicle with lights rated well in the agency’s headlight evaluations should be able to spot pedestrians.

The six superior-rated vehicles slowed dramatically in IIHS tests, in most cases avoiding the dummy or greatly reducing the risk of severe injury. Notably, the mainstream Nissan Maxima’s system avoided the pedestrian in all tests. Advanced-rated systems also achieved major speed reductions, though less consistently. The basic-rated systems failed to do so in one or more tests, while those that earn no credit failed in multiple scenarios. For example, the Ford Fusion, which got no credit, didn’t slow down at all for the simulated child darting into the street and slowed only slightly for the adult stepping into the street.

“The child dashing out from behind parked cars is a very challenging test,” said Harkey. “But it’s fitting that it was one of the main things that separated the top systems from the rest of the pack, since that is certainly a frightening scenario on Halloween or any day.”

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.




Source link

2020 Subaru Outback, Car News, subaru outback

Driving the 2020 Outback: Subaru Gives the People What They Want


Subaru struck gold in 2009 when it dramatically redesigned the Outback for 2010. But when a model is so well-loved and so integral to your brand, it’s best to take a careful approach when building an all-new version.

After all, lightning rarely strikes twice. With a clear blueprint of what shoppers want, Subaru has designed the all-new 2020 Outback as an evolution, rather than a revolution.

At first glance, the new Outback looks… a lot like the last Outback. Small changes include vertical LED fog lights that now grace the front fascia on all but the Base trim and the “Outback” logo has moved from the front-door sills to the rear-door sills. The integrated roof rails now feature cut-outs at the front and back, usable as tie-down points for extra cargo.

If the previous-generation Outback suffered from one major criticism, it was that its 2.5-liter 4-cylinder engine was too weak, and the optional 3.6-liter horizontally opposed 6-cylinder (H6) too thirsty. The boxer-style engines were particularly problematic at high elevations (not a good thing in Colorado, which is one of the brand’s biggest markets).

For 2020, the biggest change can be found in the XT trims, which are back for the first time since 2009. Look under the hood of the XT trim and you’ll find the 7-passenger Subaru Ascent’s 2.4-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder. With 260 horsepower and 277 pound-feet of torque, this engine replaces the old 3.6-liter, making it Subaru’s answer to high-altitude residents’ complaints regarding sluggish acceleration and poor passing power.

While the XT engine doesn’t turn the Outback into a performance wagon, it should quiet the critics. Power comes on quickly and motivates the Outback easily, but not excitingly. It’s the right engine for drivers living above a few thousand feet.

But what do the other Outback shoppers want? Ask around, and you’ll likely hear some similar answers: safety, practicality, and value.

Now built on Subaru’s Global Platform (SGP), the 2020 Outback should join 8 other Subaru models currently on the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s (IIHS) Top Safety Pick+ list. The new platform increases subframe rigidity by 100% over the outgoing model and offers 40% greater protection in front and side impacts.

Subaru offers its camera-based EyeSight advanced safety systems, which include automatic emergency braking and advanced adaptive cruise control with lane-centering technology, as standard equipment on every Outback. The latter allows drivers to enjoy semi-autonomous driving, and the fact that it’s standard as a part of the Base trim’s starting MSRP of $26,645 (plus a $1,010 destination fee) is impressive.

Non-forward-facing safety systems, like blind-spot monitoring and rear automatic emergency braking, will be available at an additional cost, either via high trim levels or options packages.

Similarly, Subaru’s reserves its driver-attention monitor, DriverFocus, for more expensive trims; the system uses facial recognition technology to look for signs of distracted or drowsy driving and comes as an option on the Limited and standard on the Touring, Limited XT, and Touring XT.

The 2020 Outback also continues as a standout in terms of practicality. The merits of its symmetrical all-wheel-drive (AWD) system have been covered at length (for two decades, no less), and the vehicle’s wagon-meets-crossover form factor allows for huge amounts of cargo volume; 32.5 cubic feet behind the rear seat and 75.7 cubic feet with the rear seat folded. The new Outback also showcases increased rear-seat legroom. With good fuel economy—up to 33 miles per gallon on the highway—the Outback would make a fantastic option for rideshare drivers living in rural, wintry regions.

And value? The 2020 Outback offers as much bang for your buck as any vehicle on sale today. Even the top-level Touring XT trim rings in under $41,000, delivery charge included. There are a few disappointing omissions—you can’t buy an Outback with a head-up display (HUD), and Subaru has chosen to preserve headroom at the expense of a panoramic moonroof—but the Outback includes more standard equipment at lower trim levels than many of its competitors. The startlingly crisp 11.6-inch touchscreen display, for instance, isn’t reserved for the expensive Outbacks; it’s available on all but the least expensive trim.

The Outback means more to Subaru than just sales. While it is the company’s best-selling vehicle, it has also shaped Subaru’s image, practically becoming the signature carmaker of Vermont, Colorado, and the Pacific Northwest. Considering Subaru owners’ relationships with their cars, the best Outback may not be a brand-new 2020 model. Instead, it’s one with tens of thousands of miles on the odometer and countless memories from the driver’s seat. But barring that eventuality, Subaru can rest easy knowing it has successfully evolved its flagship model, building a car that will meet or exceed the needs of nearly every shopper—even those living high above sea level. That’s what we call an influential car.

For more car news, check out these articles:

<!-- -->



Source link

PreviousNext

You Want To Have Your Favorite Car?

We have a big list of modern & classic cars in both used and new categories.